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No, Amazon Isn’t Developing Its Own Wine

No, Amazon Isn’t Developing Its Own Wine



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Or at least they haven’t developed one yet

Next wine is available to purchase on Amazon.

In late June, Amazon offered the internet a glimpse of its post-Whole Foods deal intentions with the launch of its own wine label — or so some reporters thought.

In a press release from Oregon-based King Estate Winery, one of its new wine brands, Next, was referred to as “the first wine ever developed from conception to release with Amazon Wine,” leading many to believe that there was a partnership in co-creating a new wine label.

In fact, the retail giant’s relationship to Next is much more limited. Amazon confirmed with Tech Crunch that it didn’t collaborate with King Estate on the brand.

“Next is not owned nor developed by Amazon,” a spokesperson for Amazon said. “The wine is owned and developed by King Estate it and can be purchased on Amazon Wine. Amazon’s role is to give wineries, like King Estate, an innovative format to launch new brands and reach more customers.”

Next may not have been a product of Amazon, but it is currently available to purchase through the retailer.

To read about 25 new red and white wines from six different countries, click here.


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!


How to Make Mead (Honey Wine)

Mead making goes back millennia, and honey wines have been found at archeological sites from around 10,000 BC. Humans have been making mead for a very long time, well before the advent of fancy brewing equipment.

Making mead at home need not be complicated, and just about anyone can make homemade honey wine.

A bottle of our homemade chamomile mead from 2011…opened in summer 2019.

The first time I drank mead was just after my 21st birthday, at a two-week-long medieval reenactment camp run by the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism). A bunch of us piled into the car and drove 10 hours to Western Pennsylvania for Pennsic, an elaborate medieval camping festival featuring more historical nerdery than you can shake a mead horn at.

One of my friends started a quick mead in a soda bottle, literally on the ride down. One part raw honey, three parts water and a lot of shaking made the “must.” Since it was raw honey from a local farm, it already contained wild yeasts and began bubbling before we arrived. They attached a balloon with a pinhole to the top of the bottle as a water-lock, and two weeks later on the last day of the festival we celebrated with our own hacked together batch of quick mead.

That, of course, was after sampling high-quality mead from some of the best mead makers in the country all week long. Bearded men and buxom ladies filled my glass with long-aged high-quality meads that had been started back when I was in grade school, plus plenty of experimental meads with everything from chili peppers to fennel.

Even after being spoiled with exceptional meads for two weeks straight, our hacked together batch was still darn good. Was it a 10-year oak barrel-aged mead? Nope. But I learned that mead is spectacular, and like pizza, even bad mead is still pretty darn good.

I was hooked, and now we’ve been brewing our own homemade mead for well over a decade. My husband and I made a batch of dandelion mead on our first date just over 10 years ago, and we still enjoy a bottle of it every anniversary.

There are more than 200 bottles aging down in our basement, and we’ve learned a lot about how to make truly exceptional mead at home. Believe it or not, it’s easier than you think.

Sure, I don’t make it in plastic soda bottles capped with a balloon airlock anymore, but it can be done. Don’t overcomplicate things and you’ll be a happy mead maker!