Other

Food and Music will Join Forces at Coachella

Food and Music will Join Forces at Coachella



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Most of the folks headed to Indio, Calif. for this month’s Coachella Music and Arts Festival (April 11-13 and 18-20) will be making the trek for the world-class music lineup. But anyone going for the tunes is going to want to stay for the food and drink, which will include selections from some of the West Coast’s premier culinary hotspots.

High-Class Choices for VIPs:

If you’re willing to pony up the $800 required for the Coachella VIP treatment, you’ll be pampered accordingly. VIP guests will choose from offerings like Tomas Lim’s Goldie’s, which features California-inspired, coal-oven cooked cuisine, and rustic farm-to-table selections from Jordan Toft’s Eveleigh.

Other Food Selections:

If you’re one of the many patrons with regular passes, worry not — Coachella’s still offering you some prime grub. Food spots for regular festival-goers will include Tal Ronnen’s Crossroads, which features a Mediterranean small-plate menu and an early preview of KazuNori, an affordable, high-quality sushi spot from the folks behind Los Angeles favorite Sugarfish.

Sweets and Treats:

Late nights spent dancing and early mornings spent recovering call for top-shelf sugary goods to keep you going. For desert, the Festival will feature savory-infused offerings from Semi Sweet Bakery including chocolate, butterscotch, and potato chip cookies, as well as crèmes, custards, and puddings from Crème Caramel LA.

To Drink:

As you’d expect, there’ll be no shortage of top-shelf beers, wines, and cocktails for Festival-goers to enjoy (responsibly, of course). Beer-lovers will be able to procure brews from Los Angeles’ own Beer Belly. Platinum VIP pass holders will be able to choose from a collection of curated cocktails from 213 bars in the VIP Rose Garden. Anyone looking for a caffeine pick-me-up will be able to grab a fresh roast from Portland favorite Stumptown Coffee.

Of course, this list only scratches the surface of the California culinary wonders at this year’s Coachella. For the full list, check out Coachella’s website. Or, you could always just start driving west as soon as possible.

Adam D’Arpino is the Restaurants Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @AdamDArpino.


J Balvin, Bad Bunny and more Latin artists taking the stage at Coachella

The Coachella Valley music festival marks the start of festival season. Each year, some of the biggest names in music make their way to the California desert for the weekend-long event. Coachella is one of the most-talked about events of the year. With the rise and surge of Latin music in the mainstream, it&rsquos no surprise that some of the biggest names in popular Latin music genres are set to hit the stage.

J Balvin and Bad Bunny are two of the Latin artists set to hit the stage at the Coachella Valley Music Festival

This year&rsquos talent brings an eclectic mix of performers and tunes. From regional Mexican to the sounds of traditional flamenco &ndash with a twist. Some of the talent are on the rise, while others have already made their mark in the industry. Either way, fans will make their way to the various stages to see them perform. Here is a look at some of the artists we are looking forward to seeing hit the stage.

Bad Bunny
The reggaeton singer is bringing the spirit and vibes of Puerto Rico to the festival. The MIA singer is known for his over-the-top stage presence and eye-catching style. Coming off a year of chart-topping hits and in the start of his x 100pre tour, Bad Bunny is sure to put on the performance of a lifetime.

Songs we want to hear: Caro, Solo de Mi and Chambea

Rosalía
Spanish pop singer Rosalía will take the stage at the music festival for the first time. The MALAMENTE singer draws inspiration from her native Spain, as she blends traditional flamenco sounds with pop. Fans may be in for a surprise performance collaboration if the songstress brings J Balvin on stage for a performance of their latest single Con Altura.

Songs we want to hear: Brillo (another J Balvin collaboration), Bagdad, De Aquí No Sales

J Balvin
He&rsquos no stranger to the Coachella stage. The Colombian superstar gave fans a taste of what he can bring to the music festival as he performed his hit single Mi Gente, at the 2018 festival with Beyoncé. This year, J Balvin gets a chance to command the stage on his own.

Songs we want hear: Mi Cama, Familiar, Ne Es Justo

Javiera Mena
Coachella is the perfect location for the Chilean beauty&rsquos sound. Javiera&rsquos music is the perfect soundtrack to the festival. Over the last decade, the singer has found success and now her star will rise even higher as she takes the stage for the festival season's official kick off.

Songs we want to hear: Espejo, Dentro de Ti, Alma

Tomasa Del Real
The Queen of Reggaeton&rsquos digital underground scene is ready to bring her flavor to the music festival. The 32-year-old Chilean superstar is set to bring her eccentric outfits and performances to the desert, adding more heat. This is the first time the Barre con el Pelo singer will perform at the event and it probably won&rsquot be the last.

Songs we want to hear: La Vampira, Si o No, Perra del Futuro

Ocho Ojos
These men don&rsquot have to travel far to take the stage. The California natives create a sound that is a blend of hip-hop, cumbia and electronic. The Cumbia De Este Valle band will no doubt create festival vibes as they take the stage and perform their biggest hits.

Songs we want to hear: Wao Wao, Maria Tomasa, Culebra

Other notable acts taking the stage this year are Mon Laferte, Sabrina Claudio, Los Tucanes De Tijuana and Los Robertas. This year&rsquos headliners are Ariana Grande and rapper Childish Gambino. The Coachella Valley Music Festival runs for back-to-back weekends, from April 12-14, to April 19-21.


Looking beyond the headliners at Arroyo Seco Weekend

While the cancellation of the FYF Fest may have served as a canary in a coal mine moment for the concert industry, festivals with a niche may prove to be the way forward.

Consider Goldenvoice’s Arroyo Seco Weekend, a family-friendly selection of food, drink and music that doesn’t try to offer a snapshot of music in 2018 in the manner of its springtime sibling Coachella.

Its goals are more modest in aiming to draw roughly a quarter as many people — maybe of parenting age (and their children, considering kids under 10 get in free) — with the easygoing atmosphere of a tastefully curated block party.

It’s the sort of idea that can be tough to argue with when taken with a lineup that includes top-of-the-bill acts such as Robert Plant, Neil Young, the Kings of Leon and Jack White with the seductive prospect of not trekking to Indio or farther-flung festival destinations.

And while even the middle of the lineup has its pleasures, further down holds some promise as well. Here are five not to miss between visits to Jon & Vinny’s pop-up or the Kidspace tent.

Fantastic Negrito: Mixing blues, funk and R&B, the singer-songwriter named Xavier Dphrepaulezz won a contemporary blues Grammy last year for his debut album, “The Last Days of Oakland.” That work examined the gentrification struggles of Dphrepaulezz’s booming hometown, and the follow-up, the newly released “Please Don’t Be Dead,” mines a similarly soulful, rootsy vein with timely political outrage. Sunday.

Margaret Glaspy: With acts such as the Pretenders along with New Orleans’ Irma Thomas and country upstart Margo Price, the festival offers a strong assortment of female voices, including this 29-year-old singer-songwriter, who had a breakout year in 2016 with her debut album, “Emotions and Math.” A barbed new EP, “Born Yesterday,” showed the best may still be to come. Sunday.

Pharoah Sanders: The debut installment of Arroyo Seco last year wasn’t shy about drawing from the rich history of jazz with Roy Ayers, Preservation Hall and Bennie Maupin, and this year will feature one of the most powerful sounds on tenor saxophone in Sanders. A fiery improviser, his presence feels like an inspired nod to the recent crossover success of Kamasi Washington (who also performs Saturday), whose spiritually charged compositions share echoes with Sanders, whose 1969 album “Karma” beautifully built upon John Coltrane’s legacy. Saturday.

Hurray for the Riff Raff: Nashville singer-songwriter Alynda Segarra expanded her bold, distinctive vision of Americana on her 2017 album, “The Navigator,” which was a semi-autobiographical concept album that beautifully drew from her Puerto Rican heritage and growing up as a young folk-punk in New York City. Songs such as “Rican Beach” and “Pa’lante” testify to Segarra’s readiness to mix her activism with her art, something that’s unlikely to change here given current events.


Coachella promoters look to book Dylan, Stones, McCartney and Young for mega-concert

Top row, left to right: Paul McCartney, The Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger and Neil Young. Bottom row, left to right: Bob Dylan Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend of The Who and former Pink Floyd frontman Roger Waters

It could rank as the classic rock concert of the century — six bands and performers who revolutionized popular music in the 1960s gathering in the Southern California desert over a single weekend in October.

The company that stages the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival is planning a three-night event featuring Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, the Who, Neil Young and Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters — all Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees — Oct. 7-9 at the Empire Polo Field in Indio, The Times has learned.

The six acts have never shared a billing before, and it also would be the first time that Dylan and ex-Beatle McCartney — representing what are widely considered the two most important rock acts of the 1960s — have played on the same bill, albeit on different nights.

The concert is being organized by Goldenvoice, the Los Angeles-based promoter that is a unit of AEG Live, according to people with knowledge of the plans. They could not speak publicly because negotiations with the performers were being finalized.

“It will be their full stage productions, with full sets,” said one person close to the project. That would be in contrast to most festivals that have bands typically playing abbreviated sets.

Plans are nearly complete, and an official announcement is expected in coming weeks.

“It’s so special in so many ways,” said Young’s longtime manager, Elliot Roberts. “You won’t get a chance to see a bill like this, perhaps ever again. It’s a show I look forward to more than any show in a long time.”

Under the tentative plans, Dylan and the Stones would play back to back on Oct. 7 to open the festival. They would be followed on Oct. 8 by Young and McCartney and their touring bands.

The event would conclude on Oct. 9 with the Who and Waters, the former Pink Floyd bassist, songwriter and singer.

“If you just look at it at face value, a bill like this doesn’t exist anywhere else on the concert landscape,” said Gary Bongiovanni, editor of the concert-industry tracking publication Pollstar. “There are a lot of festivals, but nothing quite like what’s being planned there. I expect it will resonate nationally — and internationally.”

The concert would gather in one weekend six of the biggest names in rock, musical prime movers who didn’t just redefine the parameters of rock music but transformed it from teenage entertainment into an art form. In many cases, their songs also served as the soundtrack to the social and political upheaval of the 1960s, ‘70s and beyond.

They put their parents’ generation on notice that the times they are a-changin’, empathized with all the lonely people and seductively exhorted peers to spend the night together. They bragged to authority figures that we don’t need no education, taunted that they hoped to die before they got old and suggested that it’s better to burn out than to fade away.

The festival would also constitute yet another sign of Goldenvoice’s continued evolution beyond its beginnings in the early 1980s as a scrappy grass-roots promoter that organized punk-rock shows in low-rent theaters, warehouses and other off-the-grid venues in Los Angeles, Orange and Riverside counties.

The company’s flagship event, the Coachella festival that began Friday, has become the best-attended and highest-grossing music festival in the world — with attendance at 99,000 a day over six days.

Coachella’s six-day gross of more than $84.3 million last year dwarfed the competition, according to Pollstar, the concert industry-tracking publication.

Although the festival has it roots in alternative rock, organizers have increasingly tipped their hat to rock’s old guard — and crowds have responded with enthusiasm to appearances by McCartney, Waters, AC/DC, Steely Dan and other classic-rock acts. That suggests the fall festival could find an audience beyond the baby boomers who grew up with ‘60s and ‘70s rock.

All the participating artists have strived over the years to remain relevant, often expressing greater interest and passion toward their latest creations than revisiting past glories.

Separately, the Stones, McCartney, the Who and Waters typically put on among the highest-grossing concert tours whenever they go on the road, usually appearing in sports arenas and stadiums.

Dylan usually plays in midsize theaters and amphitheaters of 3,000 to 10,000 capacity, and Young habitually shifts formats from acoustic to electric and solo to group settings, performing in recent years in venues as small as the 3,400-seat Dolby Theatre in Hollywood on a solo tour to the 17,500-capacity Hollywood Bowl with his band Crazy Horse in 2013.

Beyond whatever paychecks they’ll get out of it, the featured performers have the allure of a prominent role at a likely never-to-be-repeated gathering of rock music titans.

Where most festivals schedule dozens of acts performing across multiple stages, the new festival is expected to use just a single stage in the northeast corner of the polo field’s grounds.

Some of the show’s participants have performed together previously — Dylan and the Rolling Stones shared bills in South America in 1998 and even teamed up at one point for a version of Dylan’s 1965 rock classic “Like a Rolling Stone,” while McCartney, Waters, the Who and Young have appeared with one or the others at large-scale benefit concerts.

Of the four English acts on the bill, McCartney — as a Beatle — appeared on occasion with the Stones or the Who, but only early in their careers and even then, very briefly — those bands quickly playing just a song or two for television or radio programs. Waters and Pink Floyd emerged after the Beatles stopped touring in 1966.

Record producer-engineer Glyn Johns, who worked with both the Beatles and the Stones in the late-'60s, wrote in his 2014 memoir “Sound Man” that Dylan once approached him in the late-‘60s to explore whether England’s two biggest rock bands would be interested in recording with him, a rock Valhalla-like summit meeting that never came to fruition.

Dylan famously played with George Harrison in 1971, shortly after the Beatles broke up, when Harrison organized the Concert for Bangladesh benefit at Madison Square Garden in New York. That pioneering benefit concert also featured a bevy of other rock stars including Eric Clapton, Leon Russell, Ringo Starr and Billy Preston.

Dylan, McCartney, Mick Jagger (minus the rest of the Rolling Stones), the Who and Young all appeared in 1985 for the Live Aid series of benefit concerts, which played across two continents.

Follow @RandyLewis2 on Twitter. For more on Classic Rock, join us on Facebook


Techstars: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make The Music Industry Profitable

Lars Rasmussen, co-creator of Google Maps, presents his new venture Weav at Techstars Music on May . [+] 18, 2017 at El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles.

We all know that the growth of music distribution is moving fast from transaction to streaming subscriptions. The music value chain is adapting. With millions of songs streamed trillions of times, advanced technologies are necessary for consumers to find and discover their favorite songs and for music artists to find their fans and interact with them. Will the music industry be able to leverage digital technologies to adapt and be profitable?

We can get some serious tips from Techstars, an accelerator with a current portfolio of about 7.8 billion. On Thursday , its new program, Techstars Music, partnered with major players including labels Warner Music Group and Sony Music Entertainment, to demo its darling music startups at the El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles. This was the first Techstars event solely dedicated to the music industry.

The event was a microcosm of the digital transformation the music industry is going through. It included technologies to support both digital and physical music experiences. Out of the 11 tech startups featured at the event, two support live music events. One of them is Hurdl, which captures cell numbers of 60-80% of the people in a venue to communicate with them during and after the event, and uses LED wearables to turn people into lights. The second one is Robin, a personal tech concierge that helps reserve and secure tickets to live events while providing real-time demand data to event organizers.

The main feature of Techstars Music 2017 was how Artificial Intelligence (AI) is starting to power the digital music value chain to enhance creation and monetization. There just doesn’t seem to be any other way to intelligently manage trillions of nano-transactions, where creators make music to be streamed worldwide, and artists and advertisers do their best to monetize these nano-transactions by tracking song usage and enabling micropayments to rights holders.

Out of the 11 startups, 8 of them either have an AI component or have plans or a vision to incorporate it to support their business model. Robin is working on deep learning techniques to forecast live event demand and predict prices based on the willingness-to-pay reported by customers. The other seven are addressing music creation and monetization as follows:

Music Creation

Four fascinating startups are upping the ante of digital music creation.

    claims to have the first superhuman AI-powered musician, which learns from human musicians and complements or augments music compositions. is an AI-enabled music composer, performer, and producer it actually creates music from scratch! is an AI DJ that creates digi-mixes and re-mixes from streams, not from digital files. The technology allows mix creation within streaming platforms like Spotify. The company has developed a metamix, which can be used to replay these digitally-created mixes. conceives a song not as the final product, but as a recipe for variations of itself along dimensions like tempo, energy, and mood, depending on the listener’s state. Co-founder Lars Rasmussen, co-creator of Google Maps, states: "Weav's adaptive music is created by good old human artists." He foresees AI helping out, but as a complement and not as a replacement of the human artist .

Music Monetization

    uses blockchain technology to identify the usage and rights to song streams. It enables apps and platforms to identify who is streaming a song and when identifying the multiple rights holders and assigning corresponding payments. It is planning to use AI to provide usage analytics to its customers. is an automated platform for cross-promotions, where two brands join forces. Syncspot uses AI to match brands and develop brand promotion strategies. Examples of brands that have leveraged the platform are Coachella, Heineken, and Unilever. developed a technology that allows podcasters to insert personalized ads to a podcast. It is planning to use AI to perform deep audio search and personalize ads based on a podcast’s content. With a new avenue for monetization of podcasts, this technology could boost podcasting and make it much more profitable.

While not AI-enabled, the other two start-ups featured at the event touch on the important topics of promotion and distribution. Shimmur is a social platform that makes it easier for superfans to get noticed by their favorite influencers and celebrities. Shimmur flips how social media works - fans post content, decide what they want the influencer to see, and then influencers can cut through the clutter to interact with just the most meaningful fan content . Finally, Superpowered optimizes code for music distribution to reduce computing load and latency. It powers 3,000 apps that have been downloaded a billion times.

The trend is clear. AI will power the digital music value chain of the near-future, from production to search, to delivery and monetization. While some argue that with streaming the music industry is putting itself out of business, I bet advanced technologies like the ones demoed at Techstars Music 2017 will enhance digital music creation, distribution, and monetization, to eventually bring back the profits the industry enjoyed in the era of physical distribution.


How the Women Behind Coolhaus Built an Ice Cream Empire

Throughout International Women’s Month, Chowhound is sharing stories from and about a wealth of women entrepreneurs, businesses, chefs, and cookbook writers who have all found success in the food space. Here, Coolhaus co-founder Natasha Case traces her ascension to queen of craft ice cream.

When Natasha Case decided to prepare architecturally-themed ice cream sandwiches made from scratch in her Los Angeles home it was just meant to be a hobby, something fun to share with family and friends. Over a decade later, Case’s audience has grown beyond her wildest dreams.

Her company, Coolhaus, which she founded with wife Freya Estreller, is one the biggest players in the scorching-hot craft ice cream game. Specializing in gourmand-meets-Wonka flavor combinations like Balsamic Fig & Mascarpone and Milkshake & Fries, Coolhaus has become a global brand with a massive, die-hard fanbase—Cindy Crawford, who has invested in the company and served as a spokeswoman, is among the faithful.

I had the opportunity to talk with Case, who reflected on her company’s wild ride from truck phenomenon to worldwide sensation and the key lessons she’s learned at each stop.

Find the Ying to Your Yang

Cookies and ice cream isn’t the only combo that helped put Coolhaus on the map. In fact, the most significant pairing in the company’s history is without a doubt the partnership between Case and Estreller.

The two were set up by a mutual friend on a date, sparks flew, and the rest is history. Not only did Estreller hit it off romantically with Case (they would marry four years later and are now the proud parents of a three-year-old son), she would also take an interest in her fledgling ice cream sandwich project.

“She really saw the business potential in it,” says Case. “That definitely was a gamechanger.”

Case, a recent architecture major at Berkley who at the time had a career as a Disney Imagineer, was convinced. But in order to move forward, she insisted on joining forces with Estreller, a real estate investment executive. “We needed each other,” says Case. “I could do the brand and the marketing, the design, the P.R., and she would bring the finance and operations. You really couldn’t have one without the other.”

Tell a Compelling Story

Though not yet prepared to give up their day jobs, Case and Estreller knew they were onto something big. Back in late 2008, when the young entrepreneurs officially filed the LLC for Coolhaus, the craft ice cream movement was barely in its infancy. “There was so much white space, and it seemed like someone has to do this and I wanted it to be us,” says Case.

You'll Know It When You Taste It What Is the Difference Between Ice Cream and Custard? But in order to succeed in a highly competitive industry they knew their company needed to be special, starting with the product. Focusing exclusively on ice cream sandwiches was a start, and they took steps to ensure theirs would stand out. They would be made with a unique variety of high quality cookies and ice cream, scooped to order, and given architecturally-inspired names. (The Frank Gehry-inspired Frank Berry sandwich–snickerdoodles with strawberry ice cream–has been a staple since the inception of Coolhaus, which itself is a riff on Dutch architect Rem Koolhaus.)

When it came to distributing the sandwiches, Case and Estreller recognized that food trucks were becoming trendy in Los Angeles and wisely decided to join the fray.

Then, of course, there were the ladies themselves.

“It seemed so obvious that there was a need for elevated ice cream,” says Case, “made by millennials, made by women.”

Make a Huge Opening Splash

After months of perfecting recipes and forming their business plan, Case and Estreller were ready to unleash Coolhaus to the public. The two were prepared to devote their energy to the company full time, and in order to assess the risk of going all in, they agreed to employ a go-big-or-go-home strategy to mark their debut.

“The idea was that we would get it in front of the biggest critical mass possible to really see if people have chemistry with this brand…and really know if it was viable,” says Case.

Coachella, the country’s most celebrated music festival, would be the perfect venue to test the waters. Nowadays, setting up shop at the fest, which takes place less than two hours from Los Angeles, is an expensive proposition (securing a food vending slot is nearly as coveted as getting on stage), but in 2009 a maxed-out credit card with a $5,000 limit could get you in the door.

In hindsight, selling ice cream sandwiches in the desert heat to a bunch of hard-partying millennials was a no-brainer. When Coolhaus opened for business at 7 a.m. on the second day of the fest, a massive line had already assembled. Case and Estreller had easily made back their investment but more importantly, by the time the truck arrived back in Los Angeles, it had gone viral, earning coverage from the Los Angeles Times along with several local and national blogs.

Be Willing to Change Gears

After Coachella, Coolhaus was officially up and running as word of mouth continued to spread. Case and Estreller stuck with their plan to follow the typical L.A. food truck model: Park at a popular location and spread the word to your social media followers–if you Tweet it, they will come.

But then, MySpace called and the plan was thrown out the window. The oh-so-hot (at the time) social media pioneer wanted to host an ice cream social at the offices and the ladies were more than happy to oblige. “With catering, you have a guaranteed amount that you’re going to make,” notes Case.

Soon, the Coolhaus truck would become a fixture across the city, catering corporate functions, weddings, birthday parties, bar mitzvahs, and other private events.

“It just shows you why it’s important to launch even if you haven’t figured everything out,” says Case. “The market can tell you things about what it wants. We didn’t have [catering] in the pro forma, but now it’s 95 percent of our [truck] business.”

Know When to Hold ‘Em, Know When to Fold ‘Em

Now that they were well-versed in the full business potential of their trucks, Case and Estreller were eager to expand the Coolhaus brand beyond Los Angeles. After a successful launch in Austin, the ladies set their sights on New York. Not only did they have a ton of requests via social media to move to the Big Apple, nearly half of their L.A. catering clients had offices there. “We already had this built-in demand that made it feel like we have to do this,” says Case. “It’s less risky and less like starting from scratch.”

Their instincts were right and Coolhaus continues to be a hit in New York. The company was truly on a roll and Case and Estreller’s next move seemed to be another slam dunk. Since there wasn’t much of an appetite for ice cream sandwiches in New York during the winter, why not “snowbird” the trucks in Miami where the weather’s always nice?

Though smart in theory, the move ended up being a rare misstep for Coolhaus. The seven-month Miami stint was hit by unanticipated problems from dealing with local government to building the right team. “When you’re not from there and you’re not living there full-time, it’s really, really difficult,” admits Case. “Sometimes it’s just not the best fit, and you have to know when to pull the plug.”

When Settling Down, Find the Sweet Spot

Though Coolhaus was thriving (Miami notwithstanding), Case and Estreller began to realize the limitations of their business model.

“Even though the truck is very special, it can be very hard to track down,” says Case. “You don’t have regular hours and it’s kind of hard to build a culture around the truck from a corporate perspective.”

A brick-and-mortar Coolhaus location seemed like the next logical step. Close to home in Los Angeles was a must, but it wasn’t immediately clear exactly where in the city’s vast sprawl they would plant their flag. To decide, Case and Estreller employed the Goldilocks method–settling down in a popular neighborhood would be pricey, and a spot that was too remote would yield little traffic.

In the end, Culver City proved to be just right. Even though it was home to Sony Pictures Studios, not to mention a number of architectural firms, the neighborhood was still considered up-and-coming eight years ago. Moving there would be a risk but it would also have its rewards. “Culver City paid for all of our permits,” says Case. “They paid for our mechanical, electrical, plumbing…We were in there for an incredible rent. That would never happen now.”

The shop opened in 2011 and remains a local fixture. Yet again, Coolhaus succeeded by being ahead of the curve.

Stay True to Your Brand

So how does a scoop operation make the transition to retail? “I wandered into our local Whole Foods,” says Case, “and I found [an employee] and asked, ‘What do I have to do to get on the shelf here?’” (Another lesson–don’t be afraid to ask.)

Though the conversation yielded an introduction with a local buyer for Whole Foods, stocking Coolhaus would be a tough sell. At the time, craft ice cream, let alone craft ice cream sandwiches, had a limited presence in supermarkets. Plus, Case and Estreller had a very specific vision when to came how their product would be sold.

“I told her I didn’t want anyone to feel like they’re getting any compromise from what we scoop at the truck or the shop,” says Case. “We’re going to make it the same way and sell it for the same price. We’re going to have the architectural theme too. She just thought it was absolutely bananas.”

The buyer ultimately relented and in 2012 Coolhaus launched in three Los Angeles Whole Foods locations. They were an instant hit and the brand would eventually be picked by the grocery chain nationwide.

But as the company underwent major expansion and outside investors became part of the fold, Case found herself second-guessing her instincts. “When you’re getting a lot of influence from investors or people who have been in the game longer, the temptation is to dilute the quirkiness of a brand and to just kind of fit in,” she says.

“I think we went through that a little bit with some of the flavors that we brought in during that middle period which were elevated classics. It’s still a winning strategy, but I think what we’ve come back to now in the past year or so, is really, really owning the unique, weird brand that we are and bringing that to everything we do.”


Desert Trip Will Pair Rolling Stones With Curtis Stone, Other Classic Rockers And A-List Chefs

The Rolling Stones (left) and Curtis Stone are among the rock and culinary headliners at Desert Trip, which will take place in Indio, California October 7-9.

Desert Trip Welcomes Culinary Greats Marcus Samuelsson, Curtis Stone, Alex Guarnaschelli, Dominique Ansel, and Daniel Humm

October 7 , 8 & 9
Empire Polo Club · Indio, California

PASSES ON SALE MONDAY, MAY 9 at 10AM PDT

May 5, 2016 – Desert Trip welcomes the biggest names in the culinary world to join forces with six of the most iconic and influential rock and roll artists, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, Neil Young, Roger Waters and The Who in Indio, California October 7 , 8 and 9.

The weekend will feature over 30 culinary masterminds including Marcus Samuelsson, Curtis Stone, Scott Conant, Dominique Ansel, Daniel Humm, Ludo Lefebvre, Michael Mina, Alex Guarnaschelli, Michael Voltaggio, Dean Fearing, Dominique Crenn & more.

Related Articles

Also included will be an expansive craft beer program curated world-class brew master Greg Koch. Los Angeles’ cocktail kings Cedd Moses and the Houston Brothers will

helm the program featuring once-in-a-lifetime experiences, while Wine Spectator Grand Award winning sommelier and winemaker Rajat Parr will host tastings featuring an extensive selection of varietals.

Full Roster of Chefs include: Elia Aboumrad,Dominique Ansel, Scott Conant, Dominique Crenn, Jamie DeRosa, Dean Fearing, Phillip Frankland Lee, Duff Goldman, Michael Hung, Steven Fretz, Ilan Hall, Daniel Humm, Kristen Kish, Ludo Lefebvre, Michael Mina, Kris Morningstar, Jason Neroni, Chris Oh, Christian Page, Rajat Parr, Marcus Samuelsson, Curtis Stone, Guy Turland, Marcel Vigneron, Michael Voltaggio, Dakota Weiss more to be added.

Wine Experience by Rajat Parr

Price: $179 per person per day

Cocktail & Food Experience crated by Cedd Moses from 213 and Houston Hospitality


Desert Trip Will Pair Rolling Stones With Curtis Stone, Other Classic Rockers And A-List Chefs

The Rolling Stones (left) and Curtis Stone are among the rock and culinary headliners at Desert Trip, which will take place in Indio, California October 7-9.

Desert Trip Welcomes Culinary Greats Marcus Samuelsson, Curtis Stone, Alex Guarnaschelli, Dominique Ansel, and Daniel Humm

October 7 , 8 & 9
Empire Polo Club · Indio, California

PASSES ON SALE MONDAY, MAY 9 at 10AM PDT

May 5, 2016 – Desert Trip welcomes the biggest names in the culinary world to join forces with six of the most iconic and influential rock and roll artists, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, Neil Young, Roger Waters and The Who in Indio, California October 7 , 8 and 9.

The weekend will feature over 30 culinary masterminds including Marcus Samuelsson, Curtis Stone, Scott Conant, Dominique Ansel, Daniel Humm, Ludo Lefebvre, Michael Mina, Alex Guarnaschelli, Michael Voltaggio, Dean Fearing, Dominique Crenn & more.

Related Articles

Also included will be an expansive craft beer program curated world-class brew master Greg Koch. Los Angeles’ cocktail kings Cedd Moses and the Houston Brothers will

helm the program featuring once-in-a-lifetime experiences, while Wine Spectator Grand Award winning sommelier and winemaker Rajat Parr will host tastings featuring an extensive selection of varietals.

Full Roster of Chefs include: Elia Aboumrad,Dominique Ansel, Scott Conant, Dominique Crenn, Jamie DeRosa, Dean Fearing, Phillip Frankland Lee, Duff Goldman, Michael Hung, Steven Fretz, Ilan Hall, Daniel Humm, Kristen Kish, Ludo Lefebvre, Michael Mina, Kris Morningstar, Jason Neroni, Chris Oh, Christian Page, Rajat Parr, Marcus Samuelsson, Curtis Stone, Guy Turland, Marcel Vigneron, Michael Voltaggio, Dakota Weiss more to be added.

Wine Experience by Rajat Parr

Price: $179 per person per day

Cocktail & Food Experience crated by Cedd Moses from 213 and Houston Hospitality


Coachella 2013: Blowin’ in the Day 3 wind with Nick Cave, Vampire Weekend and Chili Peppers

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds perform during the third day of Coachella 2013.

A Nirvana flag blows in the strong winds in the Do Lab on the third day of Coachella 2013.

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds perform during the third day of Coachella 2013.

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds perform during the third day of Coachella 2013.

Coachella fans dance together at the Do Lab on the third day of Coachella 2013.

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds perform during the third day of Coachella 2013.

A couple share a kiss during the third day of Coachella 2013.

Kurt Vile performs Sunday at Coachella 2013

Kurt Vile and the Violators rock out Sunday at Coachella 2013.

Claire Boucher aka Grimes performs Sunday at Coachella 2013

Grimes performs Sunday at Coachella 2013.

The Lumineers perform on the main stage Sunday at Coachella 2013.

Anthony Kiedis and Red Hot Chili Peppers headline the third day of Coachella 2013.

Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea performs with the band during their headlining performance on the third day of Coachella 2013.

Anthony Kiedis and the Red Hot Chili Peppers headline the third day of Coachella 2013.

Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea jumps around on stage during their headlining performance on the third day of Coachella 2013.

Red Hot Chili Peppers headline the third day of Coachella 2013.

Coachella fans dance in the Sahara tent as the wind picks up on the third day of Coachella 2013.

Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea performs with the band during their headlining performance on the third day of Coachella 2013.

A Coachella fan gets some rest next to the main stage on the third day of Coachella 2013.

Anthony Kiedis and Red Hot Chili Peppers headline the third day of Coachella 2013.

Red Hot Chili Peppers, including bassist Flea, left, and guitarist Josh Klinghoffer, headline the third day of Coachella 2013.

Red Hot Chili Peppers, including bassist Flea, perform on the third day of Coachella 2013.

A man wearing a Santa suit joins in the mosh pit fun during Social Distortion's set on the third day of Coachella 2013.

Anthony Kiedis and Red Hot Chili Peppers headline the third day of Coachella 2013.

Anthony Keidis kicks off the final main stage set. Photo: Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Reigster

We were taking shelter from the whipping winds under one of the tents just next to the food stands, listening to however many members of Wu-Tang Clan were on stage at the Outdoor Theatre near the end of Coachella’s first weekend. Sure sounded like they were all there: Method Man, the RZA, even Ghostface Killah. Not Ol’ Dirty Bastard, of course.

Straining to keep dirt from flying into our mouths, we all repeated the same conclusion so many friends and colleagues had muttered as well: This hadn’t been a flat-out bad festival, but it sorely lacked for wow moments. The Postal Service’s brilliant set Saturday night &ndash that’s as close as it gets, more so than the random R. Kelly cameo at the end of Phoenix’s performance. And neither of those measures up to last year’s 2Pac hologram or Kanye West hovering over the crowd by crane the year before that.

Maybe, we thought, the wow moment was just about to happen. What else could it be but the full Wu taking on an N.W.A reunion in the ultimate East Coast vs. West Coast rap battle, featuring phantom ODB squaring off against hologram Eazy-E? To top it off, Daft Punk would stun everyone by surfacing high over the stage’s structure to drop Arcade Fire’s lantern balloons on everyone.

Well, c’mon, Coachella 2013 certainly needed something extra. Anything uncommon that might save this 14th festival from forgettable status.

Like, say, the worst winds the event has ever seen. That ought to help us remember it five years from now.

We’re not talking merely winds heavy enough to yank watches off wrists and send them hurtling toward Morongo. Add in sky-obliterating, sinus-clogging, lung-filling dust. By the time Red Hot Chili Peppers were fighting at their fiercest level to light up the main stage without extra screens or pyrotechnics (both were too dangerous to use), there was so much debris in the air that spotlights shining from the stage turned the typically blackened sky pure white.

“I feel like I’m in Lawrence of Arabia,” Anthony Keidis declared after rousing undeterred fans with “Dani California.” “I feel like I’m in Woody Guthrie’s Dust Bowl,” bassist Flea added.

Right around 5 p.m., after I lapped the grounds and found only that the Gaslight Anthem sound even more Springsteeenian from a giant stage and that new electro innovator Grimes is more magnetic live than her acclaimed album “Visions” lets on, the real wow factor for Day 3 started brewing. Thankfully it didn’t completely kick up until just after a winning set from neo-folkies the Lumineers that couldn’t have been better timed to make the most of both the amassing crowd (among the biggest gatherings of the fest) and the last glimmers of golden weather before things turned hazily ugly.

You could tell a full-force gale was on its way as early as the night before, when it delayed Janelle Monáe’s tent set by 20 minutes and left her pompadour flapping backwards, blasted apart. But Sunday it grew brutal, the mood-enhancing zephyrs of the previous afternoon now punishing. When Nick Cave introduced the last song of his Bad Seeds set, their current title track “Push the Sky Away,” it felt as though the winds were trying to do precisely that.

“There’s a nice cool breeze in the air,” Vampire Weekend’s Ezra Koenig noted before a grandly galloping new cut, “Unbelievers.” Couldn’t tell if he meant the understatement seriously or sarcastically, but he and his NYC mates gleefully rocked the daylight away as if these were perfect conditions. They greatly impressed with new material (from next month’s Modern Vampires of the City) that flirts a good deal more with electronic effects, while delighting the dancing masses who went wild for the fitting spirals of “White Sky,” an extended mix of “Giving Up the Gun” and all those first-album favorites: “A-Punk,” “Oxford Comma,” “Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa.”

As with Phoenix, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Local Natives, Portugal. The Man and so many more of the true (read: younger) stars of Coachella 2013, VW’s tight yet fluid flow oozed confidence, a maturity matched by unfettered exuberance. The better bands on the bill Sunday &ndash the valiant Chili Peppers (who wouldn’t dare let inclement weather dampen a propulsive hits parade) or those dizzyingly psychedelic rockers from Down Under, Tame Impala &ndash were doubly impressive for bravely raging against the elements.

By comparison, an eccentric like Kurt Vile, whose face-covering hair already leaves him resembling Cousin Itt, was consumed by gusts. But the Impalas, led by lithe, almost fey Kevin Parker, concoct acidic jams ideal for cutting through such cyclonic conditions. Their approach, whether in the atmospherics of their debut Innerspeaker or the fuzzed-up Cream-y stomp of “Elephant” (from their equally praised follow-up, Lonerism), comes entirely pre-flanged. Whereas even the Chili Peppers’ mix was warped by winds, inadvertently emphasizing guitarist Josh Klinghoffer’s support vocals more than Keidis’ leads, Tame Impala’s sound simply melded with the weather and gained forcefulness.

Nick Cave goes mad on the main stage. Photo: Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register

Towering over everyone else, however, were their Aussie elders in the Bad Seeds, whose merciless performance, delivered with the fury of hellhounds unleashed, easily stole Sunday from any up-and-comers and ranks in the Top 3 sets of the weekend, narrowly behind the Postal Service but just ahead of Blur.

Cave himself was astonishing, contemptuously dismissing photographers in the pit after one song, then leaping into it himself to holler through “From Her to Eternity.” They played only six epic songs, framing the set with new gems bolstered by strings and a kids’ choir, leaving the middle for their most demonic material.

The sight of the possessed singer, his long jet-black hair an unkempt mess from the winds, hoisting himself up to balance atop fans’ hands and roar his outrageously profane and violent version of the age-old “Stagger Lee” tale is the image most seared into my brain from this marathon. The crowd that barely stood upright against knock-you-down winds gawked at not just Cave but Rasputin-like Warren Ellis, sawing at his fiddle with his bow in shreds.

They were riveted. All 3,000 of them.

OK, there must have been more than that &ndash but not many. Legacy acts drew remarkably small audiences this weekend, a disheartening trend that continued Sunday with meager turnouts for Social Distortion’s debut, synth-pop outfit OMD’s tent set and an appearance from Dinosaur Jr.

I bet influential dark-wave outfit Dead Can Dance, who hardly anyone noticed in Mojave at the close of the fest, hasn’t played to a crowd so small since the 󈨔s. Back in L.A., the Bad Seeds have sold out the Hollywood Bowl before and their alter ego Grinderman could easily pack more people into a Palladium stand than showed up to see them in Mojave.

Maybe Lou Reed, who bowed out of Friday with two weeks to go, knew something everyone else didn’t: No one was coming to see him.

So here’s what I wonder: Would the makeup of Coachellans have been different had the majority of tickets not been snatched up before the lineup was revealed?

The crowd that bought ahead of time didn’t come for the allure of rare performances, one of the festival’s established features. They came for a party. Pretty good one, too, given how much of the event catered to them, including having the thinking person’s EDM attraction Pretty Lights on the second stage to remix Radiohead and Pink Floyd and more while providing exactly the sort of spectacle the group’s name implies.

Still, had tickets not gone on sale until everyone knew they were getting not only a fascinatingly unpopular Britpop twofer on Friday but four doses of Nick Cave plus old names like Violent Femmes and Descendents, would that have swayed different people to endure the desert? Or is what made this festival so unique disappearing in the interest of rapidly selling out to people whose regard for music centers only on what’s hot right now, not what helped that come to be.

It feels like the fest has slipped away, lost its charm in favor of catering to celebrities and uppity VIP crowds while capitalizing as much as possible on youth and rave culture. I came back to Indio, and will again, but my Coachella seems gone.

I’m not crying over that &ndash it has to evolve to stay healthy and strong, and I’d be the first to argue that Social D and the Bad Seeds ought to have switched places with Tame Impala and Pretty Lights. The era of main-stage tips o’ the hat to deserving legends is clearly over.


Work Out Like Kendall Jenner

Kendall Jenner isn&apost merely one of the many in the Kardashian Klan-she&aposs paved her own way as a successful fashion model, walking the runways of everyone from Chanel to Marc Jacobs. But it&aposs not like the 20-year-old acts like she was just born with an enviable figure-in fact, at the end of last year, she let her legions of fans know she works for it. (Kinda like her sister Khloé, right?) "To be honest, I could probably be lazy and not work out and still look the same, but I&aposm not like that. I&aposve always been really active. I like to work out to feel better about myself,"Jenner said on her site and (wildly successful) app.

Amen, Kendall. It&aposs also nice to know that someone like her isn&apost just sitting at home eating donuts and looking that fly, right? She&aposs been spotted working out all over her hometown of Los Angeles too, whether it&aposs leaving a SoulCycle studio or spending some quality one-on-one time with trainer Gunnar Peterson (who&aposs responsible for sister Khloé&aposs hot bod). But the secret to her fitness, we truly believe, lays in her awesome workout playlist, which she just released via Spotify. And we know that good tunes are the key to a great workout already.

Jenner&aposs list features tracks from Drake, Snoop and more, and she claims it&aposs the "ideal chill playlist for just hitting the gym alone to tone." Besides, whatever she&aposs doing is working-did you see how sick her body looked at Coachella? Needless to say, we&aposll have this on repeat this weekend at the gym. You?


The Win-Win Strategy Behind Beyoncé Playing Coachella

Neil Shah

What is Coachella getting out of joining forces with Beyoncé? New customers.

The annual music festival, which starts on Friday in Indio, Calif., is the highest-grossing one in the U.S. It typically sells out before ticket buyers even know who will be playing.

Beyoncé is headlining this year’s festival along with the rapper Eminem and R&B singer the Weeknd, a lineup expected to broaden Coachella’s fan base and defuse criticism that it doesn’t feature enough of the female, pop and hip-hop acts that younger listeners favor.

Nearly two-thirds of Beyoncé’s fans have never attended a music festival, according to Nielsen Music, yet they are more likely than the average listener to say it is important to see their favorite musicians live.

“Coachella could potentially have a significant number of first-timers on-hand,” says Erin Crawford, senior vice president of Nielsen Music.


Watch the video: LP - Coachella Music Festival 220418 live (August 2022).